Who Is At Greatest Risk For Eye Injury?

Raquetball_PlayerAlmost half of the 2.5 million eye injuries reported annually occur in individuals ages 18-45. The second largest age group (25%) receiving the most eye injuries are children. Even more specifically, older teens and young adults in their late twenties present the highest numbers within these groups. Of the total number of injuries, 73% of them are received by males.

Older teens and young adults receive the majority of their eye injuries from sports. The rate of injury for this group when playing sports is highest in sports like basketball, football, soccer and leisure sports (golf, tennis, bowling, etc.). Fighting and typical horsing around account for a portion of eye injuries in this age group as well. In addition, older teens generally tend to fail to pay attention to printed warnings about potential eye injury.

In addition to eye injury from sports and horsing around, young adults also receive many of their eye injuries from yard work, flying particles in a work area and from chemicals. Eye injury for women in this group also often comes from mascara wands and scratches from fingernails. In addition, young adults receive a number of eye injuries from exploding grills and fireplaces as well as from fireworks.

Older adults do not escape eye injury by any means with nearly 27% of injuries reported annually being received by individuals 46 and older. Much of the same causes of eye injury in individuals below 46 result in eye injury for those over that age, just not as many. Perhaps this is because caution increases and activity decreases with age, at least for some individuals.

There is one factor that remains constant throughout age groups and regardless of type of injury. And that factor is that the majority of ALL of these eye injuries can be prevented. The single best way to prevent eye injury, regardless of age and activity, is by wearing protective eyewear. In fact, 90% of eye injuries are preventable by wearing protective eyewear.

Fortunately, a plethora of options exist to fit every age and activity, which means few excuses exist for not wearing protective eyewear in any and every situation. There is sports eyewear, over-prescription eyewear, safety sunglasses, shooting glasses and Rx ready eyewear. Safety eyewear even exists specifically made for women and children.

For individuals needing safety eyewear for multiple situations, there’s convertible safety eyewear and multi-lens safety eyewear too. From motorcycle eyewear to safety goggles, the options available really eliminate excuses that sometimes seem to cross age and gender lines.

Eye injury, while more prevalent in some age groups over others, really does not have an age or gender bias. For this reason, both men and women regardless of age can do the one thing that will start to reduce that 2.5 million eye injuries per year… wear protective eyewear!

Earning Our Straight A’s: Safety Glasses For Kids

Children's Safety GlassesYour back-to-school checklist is worthy of an Olympic gold medal and an A+, but it’s the SafetyGlassesUSA.com team here to take it up one more notch: Safety Glasses For Kids. You’ve got the back-to-school clothes all lined up in their closets, their pens filled with ink and their pencils sharpened, and notebooks just waiting to be filled with lots of class notes and homework. Children’s safety glasses are an often overlooked important piece of the back-to-school puzzle. Think your child can do without them this year? Here are just three reasons why your darling daughter or son simply cannot.

Science Lab

Remember those awful bulky, clear safety goggles you were forced to wear in science lab? Not only were they worn by tons of other students first (hello, eye infection!), but that dated elastic band across the back wasn’t the easiest to size. Instead, check out these teal-rimmed 3M Children’s Safety Glasses equipped with an anti-fog lens. They have the safety capabilities to make every Mom and Dad breathe easy, while making their kids say “Awesome!”

Sports Team

Being a part of a sports team is a great way to promote good health and confidence in your child, as well as give you some bragging rights. Yet, we all know how common it is for those field hockey balls and sticks to end up near the face, and that innocent softball to yield a black-and-blue, bruised eye. As much as you’d like to be, you can’t be out on the field shielding your child. Instead, let his or her safety glasses do the shielding – our Pyramex Mini-Ztek Blue Mirror Safety Glasses provide style and safety.

Shop Class

Most of us here at SafetyGlassesUSA.com remember it being called “shop class”, while newer generations might call it “industrial arts.” Whichever name your child’s school gives to it, this is the class where your child gets to drill, saw, and craft to his or her delight. Your child’s teacher will be emphasizing the importance of safety, but go one step further and arm your child with safety glasses like our Smith & Wesson Mini-Magnum Safety Glasses. They’re crafted for a smaller face, reducing the likelihood your son or daughter will need to push his or her safety glasses back up over their eyes, or adjust them mid-project.

Children’s Safety Glasses aren’t just for the science lab these days – they can go a long way in decreasing the likelihood of an eye injury at sports practice, and make crafting that chair in shop class a whole lot safer. We wish you and your child an enjoyable back-to-school experience, and we’ll be here putting the “cool” back in kid’s safety glasses!

5 Most Common Types of Eye Injuries

In the United States, over 2.5 million eye injuries happen every year with 50,000 people actually losing at least part of their vision as a result. Of that 2.5 million, almost 18% are caused by projectile objects, 13% by blunt objects, 10% by body parts (fingers, elbows, fists, etc.), and 9% by sharp objects.

Of the millions of eye injuries that take place each year, almost half of them (44%) occur in the home and 40% during sport activities. The remaining 16% is taken up by miscellaneous injuries and work-related injuries.

So, regardless of location and how the injury happens, what types of injuries happen most frequently? The following are the 5 most common.

  1. Scratched Eye. Most commonly, an eye becomes scratched when a foreign body enters it and the individual then rubs the eye in an attempt to remove the irritation. Eyes also become scratched when they are poked by a foreign body. A scratched eye can become serious very quickly, with a fungal infection for example, so seeing a doctor if there is noEye Protection improvement in a day or two is crucial. In addition, a scratched eye can be worse for individuals who wear contacts.
  2. Chemical Burn. This type of injury can happen when a chemical is splashed into the eye or transferred from an individual’s hands. Fumes and vapors can also cause chemical burn to eyes. Finding out the type of chemical, acid or alkali, is crucial since one (acid) can be washed out more easily than the other (alkali). If eyes become red or blurry or do not improve after 24 hours, see a doctor.
  3. Flash Burn. Burns to the eyes also can come from sources such as sunlight, welding, tanning booths and sunlamps. Protecting eyes against sunburn, Yes, Your Eyes Can Get a Sunburn, and taking precaution in welding and other situations is key to preventing flash burns.
  4. Foreign Object in Eye. An object in the eye often leads to a scratched eye (see #1 above), and can be caused even just by an eyelash, dust, contacts and makeup. While time and eye flushing can remove these objects, when a foreign object, such as a fish hook, actually penetrates the eye, self removal is not a good idea. Instead, getting to a doctor right away is important.
  5. Blow to the Eye. These types of injuries happen often in sports, and the result is usually a swollen, black and blue eye. It’s important to check for additional injury, such as a broken eye socket or internal damage, when a blow to the eye occurs.

Perhaps the most startling fact regarding eye injuries, regardless of type and cause, is that 90% of ALL eye injuries could be prevented by wearing protective eyewear. Yet, only 50% of people wear them when working around the house, which is the most likely place to receive an eye injury.

The second factor crucial in preventing permanent eye damage and vision loss is knowing what to do, and sometimes more importantly what NOT to do, if injury does occur.

The following resource list will help you take these two crucial steps, wearing protective eye wear and being prepared if injury does occur.

Take Time to Focus on Eye Health & Safety

Fishing: A Dangerous Sport?

How to Remember to Wear Sunglasses

UV Protection – Eliminating Excuses

Be Eye Safety Conscious: 5 Ways To Prevent Common Eye Irritations

Basic Welding Safety

Eye Emergencies: Do You Know What to Do?

Eye Injuries Can Occur at Any Time and in Any Place

Importance of Good Eye Safety Habits

Safety Eyewear and Emergency Eyewash: Prevention and Preparation Matter

Safety Eyewear in the Kitchen: For Adventurous Chefs to Everyday Cooks