Benefits of Copper, Orange, Amber/Yellow & Brown/Bronze Lens Tints

Benefits of Copper, Orange, Amber/Yellow & Brown/Bronze Lens TintsSituational Benefits

Copperorange, yellow/amber and brown/bronze lens tints make your environment appear brighter and are commonly used in low-light conditions. These lens tints block blue light and enhance contrast and depth perception making them helpful for overcast, hazy and foggy conditions.

Blue light, with its shorter wavelength, scatters easier than other colors and makes focusing more difficult. Removing blue light therefore improves sharpness and depth perception and reduces fatigue.Note that these lens tints do cause some degree of color distortion, though brown/bronze lenses do so considerably less than do yellow/amber or orange lenses.

Common users of copperorange, yellow/amber and brown/bronze lens tints include baseball players, golfers, hunters and cyclists as well as those playing indoor sports and water sports. Individuals spending a considerable amount of time in front of a computer screen also find yellow/amber tints helpful because they reduce eye fatigue and strain by blocking blue light.

The specific lens tint – copperorange, yellow/amber or brown/bronze – depends on individual preference and situation.

Health Benefits

Recent studies are showing new uses for lens tints that block blue light, and the potential applications would have significant impact for many individuals. Consider the following:

  • Sleep problems – Studies show that excessive light, especially blue light given off by computer screens, televisions and ambient light in most homes, suppresses melatonin. Melatonin, our natural sleep hormone, helps us get to sleep. For those struggling falling asleep, wearing lenses that block blue light for an hour before bed may prevent melatonin suppression, thereby allowing individuals to fall asleep more quickly and easily.
  • Bipolar disorder – Preliminary research shows that blocking blue light may help stabilize mood for individuals suffering from some forms of bipolar disorder. According to Dr. Jim Phelps, this “dark therapy” works basically in the opposite way as light therapy for depression.
  • Macular degeneration – Excessive blue light from sunlight may be one cause of age-related macular degeneration. This eye-disorder exists at the leading cause of blindness in the elderly. Dr. Janet Sparrow says that exposure to blue light essentially fuels the release of harmful free radicals that damage eyes and cause macular degeneration.

Based on this research, consider wearing copper,orange, yellow/amber or brown/bronze lens tints if you struggle falling asleep, have been diagnosed with bipolar disorder, or want to prevent age-related macular degeneration.

While copper lenses block blue light better than the other lenses mentioned, they may be too dark for many to wear inside. Yellow/amber, orange and brown/bronze lenses still block enough blue light without the dimming effect to still produce some of the same benefits mentioned above.

More research is needed, but exposure to blue light clearly has significant impact. In addition to the potential effects mentioned above, blue light may also increase cancer risk as well as have possible connections to diabetes and obesity.

Because of its harmful potential, in addition to wearing lens tints that block blue light, consider also replacing night lights with dim, red lights to reduce exposure to blue light when trying to sleep, avoiding television and computer screens an hour or two before bed, and getting more natural light during the day to help regulate the body’s natural rhythms.

Finding ways to regulate exposure to blue light may not only help you sleep better, preserve eyesight and stabilize mood, it may also go a long way in benefiting overall wellness and longevity. Take time today to assess your situation to determine if blue light may be having a significant impact on your health.

Construction Workers & Eye Safety

Pyramex Furix Safety GlassesConstruction workers have the highest rate of eye injury of any workforce. The National Center for Biotechnology Information found that about 20% of occupational eye injuries occur in construction. Of that group, welders, plumbers, insulators, painters/glazers, supervisors and electricians have a higher proportion of eye injuries.

From a foreign body in the eye to passing-through injuries, construction workers simply have more opportunity for eye injury than most other occupations. For this reason, eye safety must take an even higher priority in the construction trades.

10 Recommendations for Improving Eye Safety in Construction

  1. Always wear eye protection. Most eye injuries in any occupation could be prevented simply by wearing safety eyewear consistently.
  2. Wear the right type of protection. Quite often, having the wrong type of eyewear results in non-compliance which results in injury. Wearing the right safety eyewear for the job and conditions means eyewear stays on instead of being taken off because it’s a hindrance. Consider the following examples:
  3. Check prescription eyewear. Prescription eyewear is automatically impact-resistant, but it’s not typically shatterproof. In addition, glasses provide only limited frontal protection, leaving room for small particles to make their way through the open sides, top and bottom and to the eye. Fortunately, a variety of Over-Prescription Safety Glasses exist for individuals who must wear prescription eyewear in addition to safety eyewear.
  4. Perform regular maintenance checks on safety eyewear. Safety glasses and goggles are meant to prevent injury and not sustain repeated impact. Check safety eyewear for scratches & cracks regularly, and replace when eyewear shows signs of wear and tear or when it has sustained significant impact.
  5. Clean eyewear regularly. Dirty lenses reduce vision. Cleaning safety eyewear regularly and properly helps prevent injuries caused by poor visibility, so be certain to Know How to Clean Your Safety Glasses.
  6. Store lenses properly. Instead of simply throwing eyewear into a tool box or vehicle, at least put them in an old sock for scratch protection when not wearing. Better yet, purchase a case or pouch when buying eyewear.
  7. Stay aware of surroundings. On the construction site, passing through injuries can result when a worker lets down his guard. Stay aware of other work taking place on the construction site at all times. In addition, having daily safety meetings can help ensure workers are aware of safety on the site as a whole.
  8. Know available features. From side, top & bottom protection and adjustable nose pieces and straps to the almost endless styles available for different faces and conditions, safety eyewear is available to fit every person and situation. Consult an expert when unsure of the best options available.
  9. Consider goggles. When wearing vented goggles, constructions workers may find better all-around protection on the work site as a whole. Fortunately, there are tons of options for safety goggles for applications that require even more protection.
  10. Be flexible. With the variety of tasks taking place on the site as well as required of an individual, workers may find that having more than one option for safety eyewear really provides the best protection. In addition, construction work often exists in varying conditions from cold weather and hot weather to rain and high wind. All of these factors make a strong case for staying flexible by having more than one safety eyewear option. To that end, consider the following:

If you work in construction, don’t fall prey to the top two reasons for eye injury on the job site: failure to wear safety eyewear and wearing the wrong type of eyewear. Instead, follow the above recommendations to make sure you have the best eyewear for your particular situation and that the safety eyewear you do have stays in the best condition possible.

Safety Tips for Working Outside in Hot Weather

Construction WorkerAccording to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Association, heat is the number one weather-related killer in the United States, taking more lives yearly than the combined efforts of floods, lightning, tornadoes and hurricanes.

With thousands of workers experiencing heat-related illnesses – sunburn, heat cramps, heat exhaustion & sunstroke – conditions that can quickly become deadly, knowing how to avoid them is crucial for any individual – from farmers to construction workers – working outside in the heat.

The following 3 tips provide the essential information needed for staying healthy & safe even while working for any length of time outside in the heat.

  1. Hydrate. Drinking lots of water is crucial for preventing serious illness and even death when working outside in the heat. Individuals should drink lots of water even if they don’t feel thirsty with non-alcoholic and decaffeinated liquids also being beneficial. Avoid caffeinated drinks, which have the potential to dehydrate.
  2. Protect. Protection while outside in the heat involves wearing the following items regularly: safetyglasseswithUVprotection, sunscreen, brimmed hats and loose & light clothing. Protection also means taking regular breaks and using cooling fans whenever possible.
  3. Educate. Know what triggers heat illness. Culprits include high temperatures, direct sun or heat, limited air flow, physical exertion, poor physical condition, some medications & bulky clothing.

Also, be aware of the signs and symptoms of heat-related illness, which include dry, hot skin, no sweating, mental confusion, loss of consciousness, seizures and convulsions. Knowing these simple facts helps workers not only act when necessary to prevent a condition from worsening but also keeping it from happening in the first place.

For individuals who need to work in the heat, beating the heat requires a partnership. When workers and employers both understand the potential for heat-related illness and even death, prevention becomes a key focus when temperatures rise.

Employers can provide water, breaks, safety gear & education while workers can avail themselves of the resources and take responsibility for their own safety. At the same time, each person can watch for the signs of heat-related problems in others and add a layer of helpful accountability.