Smith Optics Elite Sunglasses – The Last Word In Tough, Tactical Technology

The Merriam-Webster dictionary defines “elite” as “the best of a class,” aptly fitting the military grade Smith Optics series: Smith Optics Elite. With two series making up this superior line – Tactical Core and Tactical Lifestyle, Smith Optics is upping the bar to safety sunglasses that have a comfortable fit, while being tough enough to have a place in real-life combat zones.

Smith Optics Elite Tactical Core Series

Like all of us here at Safety Glasses USA, Smith Optics honors the men and women serving our country, and set out to design Smith Optics Elite goggles and safety sunglasses to help protect their vision, and in turn, their lives. The Smith Optics Tactical Core Series emphasizes military grade impact protection that meets US MIL-DTL-43511D standards, with a snug fit that conforms to the face without sacrificing comfort. Smith Optics excels in all of its lines, includes:

Smith Optics Elite Outside-The-Wire Goggles

Smith Optics Elite Outside-The-Wire Goggles

  • Outside The Wire Tactical Goggle: A custom fit strap keeps these Smith Optics elite goggles securely on your face so you can succeed in any situation. Many of the goggles in this line feature several different lens colors, including gray, clear, and yellow, to ensure you have the right lens for every lighting condition.
  • Aegis ARC Eyeshield: If you’re in an area where shots can be fired, whether it’s a local shooting range or overseas combat situation, ballistic eyewear is absolutely vital. The Aegis ARC line boasts PivLock Lens Interchange Technology for quick lens changing and Tapered Lens Technology to combat distortion.
  • Boogie Regulator Goggles: Keep it simple, right? That’s the methodology behind Boogie Regulator Goggles – their ventilated lenses prevent fogging, with a silicone strap to ensure a snug fit. Of course, they also meet US MIL-DTL-43511D goggle impact level standards and are ANSI Z87.1 Compliant.

Smith Optics Elite Tactical Lifestyle Series

You may not find yourself in a combat situation anytime soon, but if you’re in a non-combat military or law enforcement role, you still need the resilience and protection that the Smith Optics Elite line can offer you. With lines ranging from the classic Smith Optics Elite Director sunglasses to the sleek Smith Optics Elite Hudson line, these sunglasses feature the Smith Optics Tapered Lens Technology to prevent distortion, while still meeting ANSI Z87.1 and MIL-PRF-31013 impact standards.

Smith Optics continues to raise the bar in crafting high performance safety sunglasses and goggles designed for the everyday ballistics enthusiast to the men and women protecting our country. We applaud Smith Optics for their continual emphasis on state-of-the-art technology and durability in all their sunglass and goggle lines.

Who Is At Greatest Risk For Eye Injury?

Raquetball_PlayerAlmost half of the 2.5 million eye injuries reported annually occur in individuals ages 18-45. The second largest age group (25%) receiving the most eye injuries are children. Even more specifically, older teens and young adults in their late twenties present the highest numbers within these groups. Of the total number of injuries, 73% of them are received by males.

Older teens and young adults receive the majority of their eye injuries from sports. The rate of injury for this group when playing sports is highest in sports like basketball, football, soccer and leisure sports (golf, tennis, bowling, etc.). Fighting and typical horsing around account for a portion of eye injuries in this age group as well. In addition, older teens generally tend to fail to pay attention to printed warnings about potential eye injury.

In addition to eye injury from sports and horsing around, young adults also receive many of their eye injuries from yard work, flying particles in a work area and from chemicals. Eye injury for women in this group also often comes from mascara wands and scratches from fingernails. In addition, young adults receive a number of eye injuries from exploding grills and fireplaces as well as from fireworks.

Older adults do not escape eye injury by any means with nearly 27% of injuries reported annually being received by individuals 46 and older. Much of the same causes of eye injury in individuals below 46 result in eye injury for those over that age, just not as many. Perhaps this is because caution increases and activity decreases with age, at least for some individuals.

There is one factor that remains constant throughout age groups and regardless of type of injury. And that factor is that the majority of ALL of these eye injuries can be prevented. The single best way to prevent eye injury, regardless of age and activity, is by wearing protective eyewear. In fact, 90% of eye injuries are preventable by wearing protective eyewear.

Fortunately, a plethora of options exist to fit every age and activity, which means few excuses exist for not wearing protective eyewear in any and every situation. There is sports eyewear, over-prescription eyewear, safety sunglasses, shooting glasses and Rx ready eyewear. Safety eyewear even exists specifically made for women and children.

For individuals needing safety eyewear for multiple situations, there’s convertible safety eyewear and multi-lens safety eyewear too. From motorcycle eyewear to safety goggles, the options available really eliminate excuses that sometimes seem to cross age and gender lines.

Eye injury, while more prevalent in some age groups over others, really does not have an age or gender bias. For this reason, both men and women regardless of age can do the one thing that will start to reduce that 2.5 million eye injuries per year… wear protective eyewear!

5 Most Common Types of Eye Injuries

In the United States, over 2.5 million eye injuries happen every year with 50,000 people actually losing at least part of their vision as a result. Of that 2.5 million, almost 18% are caused by projectile objects, 13% by blunt objects, 10% by body parts (fingers, elbows, fists, etc.), and 9% by sharp objects.

Of the millions of eye injuries that take place each year, almost half of them (44%) occur in the home and 40% during sport activities. The remaining 16% is taken up by miscellaneous injuries and work-related injuries.

So, regardless of location and how the injury happens, what types of injuries happen most frequently? The following are the 5 most common.

  1. Scratched Eye. Most commonly, an eye becomes scratched when a foreign body enters it and the individual then rubs the eye in an attempt to remove the irritation. Eyes also become scratched when they are poked by a foreign body. A scratched eye can become serious very quickly, with a fungal infection for example, so seeing a doctor if there is noEye Protection improvement in a day or two is crucial. In addition, a scratched eye can be worse for individuals who wear contacts.
  2. Chemical Burn. This type of injury can happen when a chemical is splashed into the eye or transferred from an individual’s hands. Fumes and vapors can also cause chemical burn to eyes. Finding out the type of chemical, acid or alkali, is crucial since one (acid) can be washed out more easily than the other (alkali). If eyes become red or blurry or do not improve after 24 hours, see a doctor.
  3. Flash Burn. Burns to the eyes also can come from sources such as sunlight, welding, tanning booths and sunlamps. Protecting eyes against sunburn, Yes, Your Eyes Can Get a Sunburn, and taking precaution in welding and other situations is key to preventing flash burns.
  4. Foreign Object in Eye. An object in the eye often leads to a scratched eye (see #1 above), and can be caused even just by an eyelash, dust, contacts and makeup. While time and eye flushing can remove these objects, when a foreign object, such as a fish hook, actually penetrates the eye, self removal is not a good idea. Instead, getting to a doctor right away is important.
  5. Blow to the Eye. These types of injuries happen often in sports, and the result is usually a swollen, black and blue eye. It’s important to check for additional injury, such as a broken eye socket or internal damage, when a blow to the eye occurs.

Perhaps the most startling fact regarding eye injuries, regardless of type and cause, is that 90% of ALL eye injuries could be prevented by wearing protective eyewear. Yet, only 50% of people wear them when working around the house, which is the most likely place to receive an eye injury.

The second factor crucial in preventing permanent eye damage and vision loss is knowing what to do, and sometimes more importantly what NOT to do, if injury does occur.

The following resource list will help you take these two crucial steps, wearing protective eye wear and being prepared if injury does occur.

Take Time to Focus on Eye Health & Safety

Fishing: A Dangerous Sport?

How to Remember to Wear Sunglasses

UV Protection – Eliminating Excuses

Be Eye Safety Conscious: 5 Ways To Prevent Common Eye Irritations

Basic Welding Safety

Eye Emergencies: Do You Know What to Do?

Eye Injuries Can Occur at Any Time and in Any Place

Importance of Good Eye Safety Habits

Safety Eyewear and Emergency Eyewash: Prevention and Preparation Matter

Safety Eyewear in the Kitchen: For Adventurous Chefs to Everyday Cooks