13 Ways to Suffer a Preventable Sports Injury


Sports injuriesApril is Sports Injury Prevention Month. In April 2013, we talked about “Promoting Youth Sports Safety by giving 10 suggestions to help in that effort. In April 2012, we encouraged you to “Make Eye Safety Your Goal During Sports Injury Prevention Month.” Certainly, you’re well equipped with the information to keep sports safe and enjoyable.

This year, let’s look at the flip side of preventing sports injuries by telling you 13 ways to suffer a preventative sports injury and then explain why doing so isn’t the best choice.Raquetball_Player

  1. Leave eyes unprotected. Only 35% of those surveyed by the American Academy of Ophthalmology said they always wear protective eyewear when doing yard work or playing sports. Of the 40,000 eye injuries each year during these activities, more than 90% can be prevented with protective eyewear.
  2. Never warm-up or stretch. While the best method for warming up and stretching varies by individual and by sport, the need to do so exists for every athlete.
  3. Maintain a weak core. Every sport requires the use of core muscles, so it makes sense to strengthen those in order to improve in your sport. Maintaining weak core muscles also limits an athlete’s success.
  4. Ignore proper form. Most basketball injuries occur from players landing improperly on their feet. This is just one example of how learning proper form can help prevent common injuries.
  5. Let kids be kids. Sports injuries actually occur most frequently in children ages 5-14, and most of those injuries involve collisions. Perhaps forcing safety habits on kids isn’t such a bad idea.
  6. Only consider safety during games. Since there are more practices than games, it seems logical that more injuries happen during practices than during games. For this reason, always remember to practice safety so you can play safely.
  7. Skip skill levels. While challenging yourself is a good idea, going too far beyond your skill level isn’t. Know your abilities and challenge yourself sensibly.
  8. Ignore the rules. Rules bring organization to sports. They also serve to protect players. Ignoring the rules only brings chaos and injury.
  9. Refuse to wear safety gear. While preventing every sports injury is impossible, About.com says research suggests a reduction in injuries by 25% simply by taking preventative measures. These measures include wearing safety gear that is appropriate for your sport.
  10. Over-train & neglect recovery time. Athletes with the most injuries are also those with the most consecutive days of training without rest. Rest is as important to any athlete’s success as talent and performance.
  11. Play through pain & fatigue. Pain means there’s a problem. Fatigue leads to poor judgment. Both usually result in longer recovery from an injury or overuse than had you stopped and rested at the first sign of pain and fatigue.
  12. Be a weekend warrior. Neglecting regular workouts and then hitting your sport hard on weekends too often leads to injury and fatigue that puts you out of commission indefinitely. Instead, exercise consistently during the week and still enjoy weekend activities.
  13. Stick with just the ICE method for recovery. Instead, convert to the PRICE method for recovery. This method begins with protection from further injury along with restricting activity before moving on to applying ice, applying compression, and elevating.

The best way to continue enjoying your sport on the field rather than just on the sidelines involves employing habits to prevent injury. You’ll also find more success and longevity as an athlete when you make safety, prevention and common sense a part of your training program.

About Michael Eldridge

Michael Eldridge is the President and Founder of Safety Glasses USA, one of the web's largest providers of safety glasses and goggles. He's a US Marine Veteran who's particularly passionate about protective eyewear and helping people learn about vision safety. In his spare time he enjoys target shooting, fishing, camping with his family and watching Detroit Tigers baseball. You can follow Michael on Twitter @MikeEldridge73, Google or via the Safety Glasses USA Facebook Page.