7 Steps That Help Prevent Eye Allergies

Don't Let Eye Allergies Ruin Your Summer

Don’t Let Eye Allergies Ruin Your Summer

Spring has sprung and Summer is just around the corner, which means allergy season is in full swing. Common substances such as tree pollen’s  dust and pet dander can make your eyes miserable. If you suffer from red, itchy, watery eyes more than likely you’re suffering from eye allergies.

Feel free to blame your parents for this problem as most eye allergies are usually hereditary (thanks Dad). Fortunately there are are ways to help prevent or reduce your symptoms.

  1. While spending time outdoors, wear wrap-around sunglasses or safety glasses to help keep allergens away from your eyes. If your eyewear features polycarbonate lenses, you’ll get the added benefit of 99.9% UV protection as well.
  2. When driving around keep your car windows closed. Not only will this keep allergens from being rammed into your eyes, but it will help keep the interior of your car cleaner.
  3. Replace the air filters in your home on a regular basis. These nifty devices help keep allergens, such as pollen, dust and pet dander out of your home, but if your filters haven’t been changed in awhile, they may be doing more harm than good.
  4. Reduce your exposure to Dust Mites by encasing your pillow in allergen reducing covers. Wash your sheets in water that’s at least 130 F.
  5. Check the pollen reports on your favorite weather app and try to stay inside on high-pollen days. If you have no choice and need to spend the day outside, make sure to shower, wash your hair and change clothes as soon as possible to remove allergens.
  6. Try to keep your pets off the furniture and frequently vacuum your floor and furniture with a HEPA filter equipped vacuum. Avoid touching your eyes after handling pets and give “Fido” a bath if he’s been outside rolling around in high allergen areas.
  7. Schedule an exam with your eye doctor, they can provide advice on allergy specific eye drops and make sure you don’t have an underlying dry eye condition, which may be mistaken as eye allergies.

By limiting your exposure to allergens you’ll take a big step towards relief. And that means you’ll be able to enjoy the Spring and Summer even more.

Feel free to share any tips or advice you have on eye allergy prevention or relief in our comments section below.

How To Find Your Dominant Eye

Dominant Eye Test

Example of a quick test to find your dominant eye.

Your dominant eye is the one your brain favors when it process visual input. Most people instinctively use their dominant eye when looking through a telescope, aiming a weapon or looking through a camera’s viewfinder.

If you’re not sure which eye is dominate, here’s a simple test:

  1. Extend your arms in front of you with your palms facing away.
  2. Bring your hands together, forming a small hole by crossing the thumbs and fore fingers.
  3. Choose a small object about 15-20 feet away from you. With both eyes open, focus on the object as you look through the small hole.
  4. Close one eye and then the other. When you close one eye, the object will be stationary. When you close the other eye, the object should disappear from the hole or jump to one side.
  5. If the object does not move when you cover one eye, then that eye is dominant. The eye that sees the object and does not move is the dominant eye.

It’s estimated that 80% of the world’s population is right eye dominant. Contrary to popular belief, eye dominance doesn’t always correlate with hand dominance.

The Heart Health and Eye Health Connection

Eye HealthOur bodies give us many external indications of internal conditions. The ways our eyes show the health of our hearts provide one terrific example of this. In celebration of Heart Health Month, let’s explore this connection further as well as consider how keeping eyes healthy contributes to a healthier heart.

High blood pressure and diabetes cause damage to blood vessels throughout the body, including to those in the eyes. For this reason, eye doctors may be able to sight a heart problem by examining the retina during a routine eye exam. So, not only can a regular eye exam lead to early detection of eye diseases such as glaucoma, Harvard Health says it can also lead to early detection of deeper problems such as a variety of heart problems as well as diabetes.

Because only a trained ocular physician can see many indications of the more serious problems, regular, comprehensive eye exams are essential. By age 40, everyone should have a comprehensive eye exam that checks for systemic problems as indicated by the eyes. Those with a family history of eye disease should receive them sooner rather than later.

While some of the more serious diseases can only be seen through eye examination by a trained physician, there are some eye indications that everyone should be aware of an on the lookout for.

What Your Eyes Say About Your Heart also includes signs that anyone can see. Those signs include bloody or bulging eyes, droopy eyelid, rings on the cornea and thickening eyelid. These and many other visual clues can be indications of a slew of more significant problems such as high blood pressure, thyroid disease and hereditary disorders.

Additional connection between eye health and heart health lies with the importance of healthy lifestyle for both heart and eyes. Turns out that what is healthy for the eyes, is healthy for the heart and vice versa. In fact, you can Put Your Eyes On A Diet as well as Exercise Your Eyes and at the same time receive whole-body benefit, including a tremendous benefit for your heart.

So, keeping eyes healthy goes well beyond maintaining and keeping optimal vision. Begin by taking care of your eyes through simple steps such as protecting them from the sun’s harmful rays by wearing quality sunglasses and safety sunglasses. Doing so gives you and your doctor yet another tool for fighting heart disease and heading off potential problems early and enjoying healthy eyes and heart throughout your lifetime.