Construction Workers & Eye Safety

Pyramex Furix Safety GlassesConstruction workers have the highest rate of eye injury of any workforce. The National Center for Biotechnology Information found that about 20% of occupational eye injuries occur in construction. Of that group, welders, plumbers, insulators, painters/glazers, supervisors and electricians have a higher proportion of eye injuries.

From a foreign body in the eye to passing-through injuries, construction workers simply have more opportunity for eye injury than most other occupations. For this reason, eye safety must take an even higher priority in the construction trades.

10 Recommendations for Improving Eye Safety in Construction

  1. Always wear eye protection. Most eye injuries in any occupation could be prevented simply by wearing safety eyewear consistently.
  2. Wear the right type of protection. Quite often, having the wrong type of eyewear results in non-compliance which results in injury. Wearing the right safety eyewear for the job and conditions means eyewear stays on instead of being taken off because it’s a hindrance. Consider the following examples:
  3. Check prescription eyewear. Prescription eyewear is automatically impact-resistant, but it’s not typically shatterproof. In addition, glasses provide only limited frontal protection, leaving room for small particles to make their way through the open sides, top and bottom and to the eye. Fortunately, a variety of Over-Prescription Safety Glasses exist for individuals who must wear prescription eyewear in addition to safety eyewear.
  4. Perform regular maintenance checks on safety eyewear. Safety glasses and goggles are meant to prevent injury and not sustain repeated impact. Check safety eyewear for scratches & cracks regularly, and replace when eyewear shows signs of wear and tear or when it has sustained significant impact.
  5. Clean eyewear regularly. Dirty lenses reduce vision. Cleaning safety eyewear regularly and properly helps prevent injuries caused by poor visibility, so be certain to Know How to Clean Your Safety Glasses.
  6. Store lenses properly. Instead of simply throwing eyewear into a tool box or vehicle, at least put them in an old sock for scratch protection when not wearing. Better yet, purchase a case or pouch when buying eyewear.
  7. Stay aware of surroundings. On the construction site, passing through injuries can result when a worker lets down his guard. Stay aware of other work taking place on the construction site at all times. In addition, having daily safety meetings can help ensure workers are aware of safety on the site as a whole.
  8. Know available features. From side, top & bottom protection and adjustable nose pieces and straps to the almost endless styles available for different faces and conditions, safety eyewear is available to fit every person and situation. Consult an expert when unsure of the best options available.
  9. Consider goggles. When wearing vented goggles, constructions workers may find better all-around protection on the work site as a whole. Fortunately, there are tons of options for safety goggles for applications that require even more protection.
  10. Be flexible. With the variety of tasks taking place on the site as well as required of an individual, workers may find that having more than one option for safety eyewear really provides the best protection. In addition, construction work often exists in varying conditions from cold weather and hot weather to rain and high wind. All of these factors make a strong case for staying flexible by having more than one safety eyewear option. To that end, consider the following:

If you work in construction, don’t fall prey to the top two reasons for eye injury on the job site: failure to wear safety eyewear and wearing the wrong type of eyewear. Instead, follow the above recommendations to make sure you have the best eyewear for your particular situation and that the safety eyewear you do have stays in the best condition possible.

“You’ll shoot your eye out, Mom!”

Over the years, parents have warned their children countless times to be careful with objects that pose an obvious threat to their eyes, including things like BB guns and scissors. Now it’s the parents’ turn to hear a similar warning regarding champagne corks as well as those from sparkling champagnewine and juice.

Turns out, a flying cork really could take out a person’s eye. Not really surprising since a corked champagne bottle has 3x the pressure of a car tire and comes out of the bottle at 60mph.

A cork, being the perfect size to fit in a person’s eye socket, can cause a corneal abrasion (scratch to the surface of the eye), retinal detachment and even permanent blindness as it flies out of a bottle of champagne or sparkling wine or juice.

Because of the fairly common occurrence of these injuries, especially during the holidays, the American Academy of Ophthalmology issued a public service warning reminding of the dangers and providing tips on how to avoid shooting your eye out with a champagne cork.

  1. Keep the bottle chilled since pressure can build more in a warm bottle.
  2. Avoid shaking the bottle, which only increases the pressure and the cork speed.
  3. Place a towel over the top of the bottle to keep corks from launching into the air.
  4. Watch your aim by pointing the bottle away from people.
  5. Hold the cork and twist the bottle instead of the other way around.
  6. Never use a corkscrew, which basically makes a cork an even more dangerous projectile.

To make sure you get a kiss along with your bubbly instead of a trip to the emergency room to ring in the New Year, plan to use these tips for safely opening that bottle of bubbly when the clock strikes midnight.

The Top 5 Most Unlikely Holiday Eye Safety Risks

Christmas DecorationsWe’ve heard it all here at SafetyGlassesUSA.com – from getting a little too close to those Christmas tree branches to holiday lights popping as you peer at them. So what does trimming the tree and uncorking that champagne bottle have in common? They’re part of our top 5 unlikely holiday eye safety risks that really can happen, even to you. We know that even the most avid of Safety Glasses enthusiasts won’t be wearing safety glasses to that holiday party, but we’re here to help you identify eye safety risks this holiday season to keep you safe through the New Year.

#5 Most Unlikely Eye Safety Risk: Sharp-Edged Toys

Before you gift that doll beach house or remote control car to your little ones, be sure to unpack it and look for any sharp edges in the toy or its accessories. You’d be surprised how many eye injuries occur on Christmas Day when children are just so excited to play with their new toys. If you do spy an eye injury waiting to happen, choose an alternate gift, or ensure your child is wearing Kids Safety Glasses.

#4 Most Unlikely Eye Safety Risk: Colliding with the Mistletoe

The mistletoe is purposefully meant to sneak up on us, but sometimes a bit too much – and right in the eye! Those of us on the shorter side are in luck, but for the tall guys and gals among us, keep an eye out for that lovely mistletoe as you duck under the doorframe.

#3 Most Unlikely Eye Safety Risk: Christmas Lights Breaking

Christmas lights are chock-full of eye safety risks, with one of the most prevalent being lights ‘popping’ due to prolonged use over the years. This happens all too often when mounting and dismounting lights, and as we know all too well, the smallest of glass shards can negatively affect your vision forever. Be sure safety glasses are covering your peepers when working with holiday lights this season!

#2 Most Unlikely Eye Safety Risk: Christmas Tree Branches

How often do you reach close into your tree to water it or put a new ornament on it? Chances are quite a bit during the holidays, with those branches then coming dangerously close to your eyes. We hope you wear safety glasses while putting ornaments on your tree, but at the very least, take care to pay attention to looming tree branches as you trim and water trim.

#1 Most Unlikely Eye Safety Risk: Popping the Champagne

New Year’s Eve and champagne go hand in hand, but so do champagne bottle corks and eye injuries. This year, uncork your bottle of champagne the right way – with a hand towel over it to ensure the cork doesn’t fly. Sure, it’s not as flashy as champagne flying across the room, but sending a party guest to the emergency room isn’t exactly a party memory you want. Stick to safe champagne uncorking for a healthy and happy New Year’s celebration.

We hope we’ve uncovered your eyes to some of the most unlikely eye safety risks during the holiday season. Keep a pair of Safety Glasses on hand as often as possible, and exercise thinking safely as you enjoy your holiday season. Happy holidays from all of us at SafetyGlassesUSA.com!